Aubrey Parasolle

With her thick, low alto tone and heavy swing rhythm, Aubrey Parasolle?s voice emotes a quality akin to jazz singers who have been singing for decades. However, once one sees her edgy hair, petite stature, and hears her thick Jersey accent, they know that this 24 year-old is not the average jazz performer.
 ?Jazz, by most standards, is an older genre of music, and I have definitely been inspired by jazz artists of the past,? Aubrey said. ?But I think my youth and vitality add a modern edge to the music. I approach it with a different background, and I bring fresh interpretations of classic standards that an older artist just couldn?t illustrate on stage. A lot of times, with their maturity, brings a harsher, more cynical outlook on life and love, and while I have experienced my share of hardships, I?m still relatively unaffected and optimistic. I think that shows through in my performances.?
Though barely into her twenties, Aubrey is hardly an amateur to performing and to jazz. Her family raised Aubrey on a steady diet of jazz greats such as Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughan, Miles Davis, and Clifford Brown. Those complex rhythms and harmonies implanted themselves in Aubrey?s ear and before long, she was taking jazz voice lessons and participating in several high school choirs and musicals. In her four years at Roxbury High School, Aubrey performed in the elite jazz choir, honor choir, madrigal ensemble, and was selected for regional and all-state choirs, as well as snatching the lead, Adelaide, in Guys and Dolls. At Roxbury, she was also given the opportunity to take private lessons and receive clinics from New York Voices members, Kim Nazarian and Darmon Meader.
Those successes in high school brought her to the University of Miami Vocal Jazz program, where she received a half-tuition scholarship to study under noted professors such as Larry Lapin, Whit Sidener, and Kevin Mahogany. While in Miami, Aubrey snagged steady jazz gigs at Books & Books and at Caf