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Kate Baker Quartet

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When:
November 24, 2017 @ 8:00 pm – 11:00 pm
2017-11-24T20:00:00-05:00
2017-11-24T23:00:00-05:00
Where:
Trumpets Jazz Club
6 Depot Square
Montclair, NJ 07042
USA
Cost:
$20 pp music charge prepaid tickets $22 pp music charge at door $12 pp minimum

2 sets: 8 p.m. and 10 p.m.
$20 pp music charge prepaid online $22 pp at door  $12 pp minimum (food/drink)

Trumpets continues its celebration of Women in Jazz with the artistry of versatile vocalist Kate Baker.
Kate Baker
Vic Juris

Kate Baker’s love of music is the basis for two remarkable talents, as a singer and an educator.She has a distinctive vocal style and lyrical expression and she has evolved into one of today’s most sought after singers. Her voice resonates with her love of diverse musical inspirations whether Jazz, Brazilian, Latin or the Blues. Be it a Cole Porter standard or an Antonio Carlos Jobim composition, English or Portuguese, Kate is at home. Ms. Baker is a musician’s singer. Her high level of musicianship has enabled her to successfully sing in a variety of settings, from an intimate duo to fronting her five-piece ensemble, as well as performing as a guest artist with Big Bands. Kate’s debut CD shines with Vic Juris, Richie Cole and the Alto Madness Orchestra.

Ms. Baker’s distinct and authentic sound has excited audiences worldwide. In Europe, she has been a featured vocalist at numerous Jazz events, including the Euro-Meet Jazz Festival, The Carini Jazz Festival and The Pergine Spettacolo Jazz Festival. In the U.S., her festival and concert credits include Berkshire Jazz Festival, The Texaco Jazz Series in NY City, William Paterson Jazz Room Concert Series, Liberty State Park Jazz Concert Festival, The Tarrytown Jazz Festival, The JVC Jazz Festival, The OSPAC Jazz Festival and many more. She has filled the rooms at major NYC area clubs such as: The Blue Note, Birdland, Trumpets and Visiones. Kate has had the pleasure of working with such talented artists as Claudio Roditi, Norman Simmons, Harvie Swartz, Houston Persons, Richie Cole, Vic Juris, Dick Oatts, Dave Stryker, Daduka Fonseka and many others.

Vic Juris

A native of Jersey City, N.J., Juris took up guitar at age 10 during the summer of 1963. Accordion, he notes, was a far more popular instrument than guitar at that time. All that would change the following year when Beatlemania washed up on the Jersey shore.

Vic Juris

Juris got his first electric guitar on Christmas of 1964, and by the mid-’60s he was playing cover versions of Jimi Hendrix, Cream and the Temptations material in rock and R&B bands around his area. He discovered jazz in his late teens and subsequently studied with Philly jazz guitar legend Pat Martino.

In 1975, Juris made his recording debut on alto saxophonist Eric Kloss’ Bodies’ Warmth (Muse). He later gigged with fusioneer Barry Miles before hooking up with alto-sax burner Richie Cole, appearing on two hot, boppish offerings in 1977’s Alto Madness and 1978’s Keeper of the Flame (both on Muse). In the early ’80s, Juris immersed himself in acoustic guitar, performing duets with Larry Coryell and Biréli Lagrène, and by the late ’80s he joined bassist Gary Peacock’s group.

For the past 10 years Juris has been hitting the road hard with the Dave Liebman Group. “The band started out where we had keyboards,” says Juris, “and then Dave decided that he just wanted to go with the guitar. So my original role was kind of like a second horn, and the guitar is very cool for that. But now that’s completely changed to where I’m more of a colorist and chordal accompanist while also doing a bit of the second horn thing.”

The Liebman gig affords Juris quite a bit of freedom. “Dave is into doing a wide variety of stuff and he pretty much gives me the green light to do whatever I want,” says Juris. “He likes the fact that I can go through different styles in a given set and he also likes the effects for some of the electric Miles stuff that we do [culled from On the Corner, Get Up With It and Dark Magus, all recordings made during Liebman’s tenure with the tumultuous Miles Davis bands of the early ’70s]. So I carry a RAT pedal for a touch of distortion and I also use my Roland GR-50 guitar synth for colors and textures on some tunes. We also do some Jobim music in that band [from Liebman’s GMN.com recording, The Unknown Jobim], so he likes me to play the nylon-string acoustic on that stuff.”

Juris uses a nylon-string Takamine acoustic guitar for the Brazilian music, but his main ax since 1980 has been a thin hollow-body guitar made by New Jersey luthier Tom Doyle. He also plays a closed archtop (no f-holes) built by Phoenix luthier Glen McKerrihan.

From Jazz Times. http://jazztimes.com/articles/19834-vic-juris

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